Health » Overview

Salzburg Global Seminar has long been a leading forum for the exchange of ideas on issues in health and health care affecting countries throughout the world. At these meetings agendas have been re-set affecting policy and practice in crucial areas, such as patient safety and the engagement of patients in medical decision making. In 2010, Salzburg Global Seminar launched a multi-year series of seminars to crystallize new approaches to global health and health care in the face of emerging challenges affecting us now and set to continue on through the coming generation.


Interviews and coverage from our Health programs

Anna Matheson - Reflections From a Palace in Salzburg
Anna Matheson - Reflections From a Palace in Salzburg
Anna Matheson 
Anna Matheson was a participant of the Salzburg Global session, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals, which took place in December 2017. This article was first published by Massey University. The original article can be accessed here. Who would have thought there is an organization whose main activity is facilitating pop-up think tanks to challenge current and future leaders to solve issues of global concern? Well, the Salzburg Global Seminar does just that.The organization runs sessions with invited guests on globally relevant, diverse topics in their glorious home, the Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, which also happens to be the where The Sound of Music was filmed. As an aside, although the movie was filmed on the magnificent grounds of the Schloss, the inside was not filmed as a session was underway at the time – and it was considered extremely important the fellows were not disturbed in their ruminating. Founded in 1947 by three Harvard students, the Salzburg Global Seminar was intended to be an international forum for those seeking a better future for Europe and the world following World War II. As the organization’s website states: “The founders believed that former enemies could talk and learn from each other, even as countries reeled from the ravages of war. Looking beyond Europe’s immediate needs for physical reconstruction and economic development, they argued for a 'Marshall Plan of the Mind' as a critical element of recovery.” Bringing countries together to talk, who had long been at war, was meant to be facilitated by the beautiful and calm setting of the Schloss Leopoldskron.I arrived at the Schloss, surrounded by snowy mountains and at the edge of the icy lake, the Leopoldskroner Weiher, to participate in Session 592, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals. I was invited to attend because of my research and thinking on health inequalities and complexity in social systems. Most of the other 59 fellows were leaders from health and community organizations from around the world. The largest representation was from the United States of America as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (the biggest public health philanthropy organization in the US and funder of the World Health Organization’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health) was a partner in the session. Schloss Leopoldskron on the edge of an icy Leopoldskroner Weiher (Picture: Anna Matheson) Throwing About Ideas The four and a half days of the meeting were full of talking, presenting, sharing, planning and eating in majestic, history-laden rooms. A photographer was continually capturing the discussions; a graphic artist depicted the days’ ideas and each morning on our desks was a four-page newsletter with photos and stories of the previous day's ponderings. Not insignificant was the Bierstube – the basement bar in the Schloss where conversations continued – as well as table tennis, foosball, karaoke and dancing. Another aside I need to mention was the “dance-off” that spontaneously happened among the men on at least two of the nights – though I would be remiss if I suggested there was a clear winner among the Colombians, the Scottish or the Rwandans.When we weren’t hanging out in an Austrian basement, we were self-organizing into working groups to come up with tangible plans for action around the main themes that were emerging from the meeting. Dr Anna Matheson participating at Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals (Picture: Salzburg Global Seminar/Katrin Kerschbaumer) An Extraordinary Experience The connecting thread was the imperative to be “people-centered”, even when considering big system challenges. One of the working groups began developing a framework for systems change to create more sustainable health systems; many at the session were frustrated by their inability to sustain health system changes and the often unseen barriers to change that existed. Another group aimed to build a business case for why urgent attention should be given to understanding the intersection between individual, community and planetary health. A third group developed plans to create a global toolkit to help hospitals improve their capacity to contribute to building healthier communities. A fourth group mapped out a strategy for how to take “innovation to scale” in order to impact significant public health challenges. Another focused on the role of clinicians and how services could be developed to assist them to reach further into the community. A sixth group explored how global attention might be moved away from prioritizing big data and more towards people-centered intelligence. While the last working group planned a collection of articles to be written for the British Medical Journal to showcase the session themes and experiences of those attending.Participating in Session 592 of the Salzburg Global Seminar was extraordinary. Aside from the surreal setting and scintillating company, particularly heartening for me, was hearing all the passionate discussions that normalized talk of complex systems and the need for systems change in relation to health and equity. The tide is really turning. Fragmented, linear thinking and actions that disregard the wider systems within which they are nested is falling out of favor. A deep and considered understanding of social complexity is shifting away from being on the fringe as it becomes clearer that different thinking, and different methods and actions, are necessary if the complex global, and local, challenges that we face are to have any chance of being addressed. Impacting the rising prevalence of chronic health conditions in our communities and reducing health inequalities are just two of these challenges that require systems change in order for progress to be made. I am looking forward to the on-going work, and new relationships formed from Session 592 in pursuit of this progress. Dr Anna Matheson is a senior lecturer in Public Health from the School of Health Sciences and Associate Investigator, Te Pūnaha Matatini – Centre of Research Excellence for Complex Systems, Data and Networks.
READ MORE...
Lynna Chandra – The Way We’ve Been Taught to See Our Work is No Longer Applicable to the Way that Our Lives are Being Led
Lynna Chandra – The Way We’ve Been Taught to See Our Work is No Longer Applicable to the Way that Our Lives are Being Led
Oscar Tollast 
When details first emerged of the Salzburg Global session, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals, Lynna Chandra, the founder of Rachel House, sensed a new opportunity. “When this topic came up,” Chandra says, “I actually wrote to John [Lotherington] and said, I think I’d like to learn from this.” Chandra, who describes herself as a problem-solver, was looking to explore why people were still unable to access care in different parts of the world. The topic of building healthier communities was brought up in the previous Salzburg Global session she attended in December 2016: Rethinking Care Toward the End of Life. This session is where Chandra began looking at the role of the health system. Despite the building of new hospitals and improvements made to health care facilities, Chandra suggests a disconnect remains. She says, “We still see the silent group of the people with chronic disease staying at home and the poor not being able to access the care.” Between 2006 and 2016, Chandra helped pioneer pediatric palliative care services in Indonesia. Rachel House has provided palliative care to more than 2,600 children and their families and training to more than 6,000 medical professionals and community members. Chandra is concerned the money spent on health care around the world isn’t being invested wisely. She says, “We continue to not give people what they need, and often give more than what people really want.” Chandra says conversations with fellow participants at Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals, have confirmed to her that more frontline staff are needed. This change would lead to more people on the ground understanding people’s needs, not only the things that can be quantified and measured but the subjective factors in each scenario. “I think Salzburg Global Seminar has so successfully put together doctors who really care, doctors who believe that there has got to be a better ear on the ground to really connect with people one on one in order for us to deliver what the sustainable development goals are, really understanding what would actually make people have better quality of life, and the social determinants of health.” During the session, Chandra took part in a panel discussion on the smart utilization of technology in health care. She questioned how to build bridges between technological experts and participants in the room who were “ready to create change, ready to disrupt the way we think, and challenge the status quo of the hospital.” Chandra believes there are blocks in the system that prevent healthier communities emerging. She highlights high profile meetings concerning environmental matters which fail to include Ministers of Health in discussions. She says, “The way we have been taught to see our work is no longer applicable to the way that our lives are being led.” In September 2016, Chandra stood down from Rachel House and switched her attention to a new project. She has dedicated the past 12 months to “really learn” and has continued to serve on the boards of Assisi Hospice, the International Children’s Palliative Care Network, and Bamboo Capital Management. Chandra doesn’t have a fixed idea as to what her next chapter will look like, but she knows “inherently and instinctively that it has to be something to do with community care, it has something to do with primary care, [and] it has something to do with bringing care closer to the people and have a better understanding of the people.” Chandra says she has “learned so much” at the session and will take away the possibility of working with several of her fellow participants in the near future. She congratulated Salzburg Global for bringing together people with great potential to create change and disrupt the status quo. When asked what inspires her to do the work she does, Chandra draws in a deep breath before replying, “I think to serve.” She adds, “It frustrates me to see that where there is so much abundance, there is so much possibility around, and yet the poorest and the people without a voice continue to be under-served, continue to go without. Fathers continue to see their children die without the ability to help them. Mothers continue to see their children suffer in pain in the final days of their lives, and yet there is no help. Even in a country where we have so much, that population continues to suffer. I think it is… I can’t believe we don’t have a solution. I’m just impatient, I guess, I don’t know." The session, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals is part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
READ MORE...
Magdalena Seol - Business and investment can drive a more sustainable Asia
Magdalena Seol - Business and investment can drive a more sustainable Asia
Magdalena Seol 
Seol was a participant at The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia. All participants were invited to share their own vision for "the Asia we want." Building a sustainable economy is a critical concern not just for policymakers but also for businesses. Our generation lives in a historic time: the next decade will be an inflection point for the next hundred years. If we are to build a sustainable and inclusive society, it is necessary to invite and unleash the private sector resources, creativity, and drive into our grand mission. 90 percent of the jobs created during the 15 years of the Millennium Development Goals were created by the private sector, signaling an essential role that businesses will need to play in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and lifting the remaining 700 million people around the world out of extreme poverty. Accelerating sustainable economic growth requires adequate private sector finance - especially in critical public infrastructure - to preserve scarce public dollars and reach the scale as needed. Building human capital needs not only finance but innovation and management efficiency that can be drawn from the private sector. Fostering resilience to global and regional shocks also requires a robust participation of the private sector. Now, let’s look into Asia. Below is a map created by Brilliant Maps. You will see a circled area in it. Circle centered on 106.6° East, 26.6° North, projected using GMT, created by BCMM - Brilliant Maps More people live inside this circle than outside of it, with many of the world’s most populous countries located in the circle – China (first), India (second), Indonesia (fourth), Pakistan (sixth), and Bangladesh (seventh). According to the UN DESA, two-thirds of the projected population growth is happening in the high-food deficit regions of South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, presenting the challenges of not only “overpopulation” but also “disparity.” The economic transformation the Asian region showed in recent decades is indeed an unprecedented one. However, persistent inequality and environmental degradation can be a threat to the “Asian Century.” Feeding and conserving Asia has now become an urgent problem. In the meantime, business cases for achieving the SDGs are expanding worldwide, and Asia may be particularly well placed to reap the collective benefits of such cases for a few reasons. Firstly, there are already sizable businesses that have value chains that involve millions of enterprises in the region. Secondly, many governments in Asia are able to shape market activity and set nation-wide goals. Thirdly, culturally, Asian societies tend to value environmental protection, social justice or education, which strongly resonate with the Global Goals. A quantitative analysis conducted by the Business and Sustainable Development Commission and others estimates that companies pursuing strategies aligned with the SDGs in the region with sustainable business models are likely to create economic opportunities worth US$5 trillion in a few key market areas – food & agriculture, energy, cities, and health – and generate 230 million new jobs in Asia by 2030. The total estimated value, US$5 trillion, is even introduced as a conservative number. Additional value can be generated from other sectors such as ICT, education, and consumer goods, which are estimated to add US$12 trillion. Pricing in environmental costs can further increase this size. And if progress is made in gender equality in the region, where women traditionally have not engaged in the economy, the analysis expects it to add another 30 percent growth in the economy of those Asian countries. The good news is that across the region, businesses are already pioneering innovative business models and applying new technologies to unlock sustainable opportunities that are in line with the SDGs. The private sector – businesses and investments – will have critical roles in our march toward achieving social and environmental sustainability. First and foremost, businesses can address the manner in which they conduct their business activities – compliance, risk management and ‘do no harm’ – across their value chains. Developing new, innovative and inclusive products, services, technologies, and ways of doing business in the market that can contribute to improving people’s lives and environmental performance is also a unique part that businesses can contribute. Scaling the new business models and shifting the pioneers to common practice will require various layers of collaboration within and outside the corporate sector such as project-level financing and implementation partners, industry-level alliances, and multi-stakeholder platforms and networks. To crowd in private capital and investment, we will need to continue developing new and creative financial products. For instance, this could include bonds recently issued by the World Bank that directly link returns to the businesses’ performance in advancing the development priorities set out in the SDGs; drawing in non-traditional sources of finance such as sovereign wealth funds and pension funds with trillions of dollars in liquidity; or “greening” the financial sector with more cases of green bonds at municipal, national, and regional levels. All of these measures may not be enough to fully tackle the multiplying pressures and mutually reinforcing challenges imposed on the region’s sustainability. This will be an on-going evolutionary process of finding, testing, and establishing innovative models and solutions. While the problems are daunting, I am optimistic that we will be able to unlock the socioeconomic potential of the private sector in collaboration with governments, multilateral institutions, nonprofits, and ultimately, with citizens. Magdalena Seol is an international expert in sustainable development and public sector innovation. She founded Global Development Advisors, a strategy advisory consultancy that solely focuses on global development and public impact problems Session 591 - The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia- is the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. For more information on the Session, please click here. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session on social media, follow #SGSasia.
READ MORE...
Joshua Bamberger – We All Deserve to Have a Decent, Safe Place to Live
Joshua Bamberger in the Meierhof courtyard during Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals
Joshua Bamberger – We All Deserve to Have a Decent, Safe Place to Live
Mirva Villa 
Joshua Bamberger has worked as a family physician for almost 30 years. While working in San Francisco, he has seen patients entering hospitals living in extreme levels of poverty. These patients are able to benefit from the hospital’s resources in the short term, but the difficult circumstances in which they live have often been far too powerful for his work to have a long-term impact. “[It’s] as if I was treating people, and it was almost irrelevant to their wellbeing,” Bamberger says, speaking at the Salzburg Global Seminar session, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals. “One thing that seems to help the people who I serve to feel better, live longer and have the quality of life that we all deserve is to have a decent, safe place to live.” Bamberger has become a strong advocate of providing housing as the primary and most important aspect of improving people’s health. It has been his passion for the past 10 years. “For people who don’t have a home it is the most important thing. Why? On the one hand, you can’t take your medications regularly unless you feel valuable. I can prescribe them to you, but if you don’t eat them, they don’t work. For many people who live on the streets, their sense of wellbeing, their sense of value is so low that the motivation to take the medication regularly is diminished.” Having a place where you are safe and cared for helps increase a person’s sense of dignity and their willingness to take care of themselves, Bamberger argues. But it’s not just that: living on the streets is very disruptive to health. Bamberger says, “Stress hormones that are constantly flowing through your body, they erode your ability to heal, to have a robust immune system, to battle cancer, to be able to function with a cardio-vascular disease. All the things that cause harm medically just don’t get better in an environment where your life is uncomfortable and stressful.” Homelessness is a big issue in San Francisco area. According to the 2017 census provided by the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing in San Francisco, there were 7,499 individuals without homes, and little over half of them were living unsheltered, sleeping outdoors. “It’s bad,” Bamberger says. “I’ve been doing this for 30 years and I’ve never seen it worse, it’s really disheartening.” He thinks the main driver for it is the ever-expanding U.S economy, which he suggests has created a lot of wealth but also pushed up the prices of commodities. “If your finances are static at an incredibly low level and everything else is becoming more expensive, your buying power becomes less and less, particularly around housing. When I moved to San Francisco in 1989, the apartment I got was something like $400 a month on rent, and it was a nice apartment: one bedroom with a nice living room, it had a good view… You can’t get an apartment like that for less than $2,600-3,000 today,” says Bamberger. The problem is obvious to him. Many people will never be able to afford to rent, let alone buy their own apartments. He says, “There’s no pathway to get off the streets unless the government pays for your housing.” That’s why Bamberger hopes to see the health care sector embrace the issue of housing as something worth investing in. He hopes more people can see the benefit of reducing the expenditure on health care, and improving the quality of people’s lives by providing them with homes. He can’t understand why people working in hospitals don’t feel like housing conditions of their patients are their responsibility. Bamberger feels there is a great disconnect between the “extraordinary investment financially and emotionally in health care, and the almost disregard of some of the basic conditions that make humans human.”  Bamberger believes a hospital is responsible for assessing and improving the housing conditions of the people it treats. He recognizes hospitals want to be more responsive to community needs, but he suggests the threshold should be set higher to include the needs of individuals living on the streets. During this session, Bamberger’s questioned the practice of treating someone at hospital for a serious condition to only then send them back to living on the streets. “I think most people here and elsewhere are able to somehow insulate themselves from the absurdity of making such a technologic investment, and then just having someone walk back to the sidewalk, sleep on the street… I can’t do that, so it’s a very uncomfortable place to be.” Bamberger considers every workday a success. He’s already helped develop 2,000 housing units in San Francisco and is hoping to develop thousands more over the next five years with financial support from health care systems. Being able to move somebody indoors, hand them the key and welcome them to their new home is an unbelievable feeling, Bamberger says. “They just totally glow, wondering how this happened to them. It’s sort of how I felt when I was offered to come here to Salzburg. Me? Coming to Salzburg, flying across the world? It’s an incredible excitement, and I can imagine that times a hundred when you move into a beautiful place to live after being on the streets for so many years. “ The session, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals is part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
READ MORE...
Fellows Present Ideas on Enhancing Collaboration and Building Healthy Communities
Fellows Present Ideas on Enhancing Collaboration and Building Healthy Communities
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Participants of the Salzburg Global session, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals, have been encouraged to keep the conversation flowing following the end of the five-day program. This message came after participants presented their ideas on the final day of the program to enhance effective collaboration and information-sharing between hospitals, social services, and community organizations. Their presentations explored several areas, building on the discussions and exercises that had taken place over the previous days. The first group to present did so under the title of “Yearning for Change.” They advocated a framework for system change convening and assisting like-minded leaders in a community social movement to share experiences and test ideas while committing to a sustainable health system. This would lead to a “Salzburg Community of Practice” – a group of peers from different countries who share a passion for sustainable system change who learn how to do it better through regular interaction on a voluntary basis. Everyone has access to information and each other. All peers share a view of what’s significant. The group said they’d know if they were successful when an online library was established and actively used. Other markers include active participation by a minimum of five countries, and the sense participants find it useful. The next presentation focused on creating a resource which would help result in healthy people, healthy communities, and a healthy planet – taking innovation to scale. This group produced a set of values they felt were paramount for successful innovation scale, which they referred to as the Four-Is Framework. Innovation, issue, and influence are the essential domains of interaction that are necessary. Impact, the fourth “I,” is only achieved when the other fields have had time to interface and intersect. Underpinning this framework are guiding principles of equal partnership and representation, a focus on trusting, respectful relationships among all stakeholders, stakeholder/community engagement and co-creation, continuous involvement of end-users, investment of resources in enabling capacity for stakeholder engagement, and incremental progress. The third working group showcased an action-oriented research agenda, designed to improve individual, community and planetary health simultaneously. The rationale behind it was that a more conscious research and action agenda on social determinants of health could maximize health system impacts and investments to achieve benefits at all three levels. The group highlighted several domains where interventions could be identified. These areas included food insecurity, poor and unhealthy housing, energy poverty, transportation, waste management/recycling, air quality, education, violence prevention, and social isolation. An example of a research question could be: What are the most effective partnership models to achieve maximum results? If health care professionals are to reach out to the community, they’ll need to understand the community first. This message came through during the next presentation. The working group behind the presentation focused on services to help clinicians to improve communication. Members advocated using local community resources and smart and existing technology to integrate, share and disseminate knowledge to improve community health. The methods of achieving this include identifying community needs and health guardians in the community, using smart technology to develop connectivity and health education, and having a regular review of the whole process. The presentation concluded with the message: “Change will happen. It just needs passion, commitment, and desire.” Throughout the session, participants considered the capacities of hospitals and the position they were in to support healthy communities. One working group decided to focus on ways to improve their capacities through a global toolkit. The final product would be a dynamic digital repository, which brings together individuals, frameworks, methodologies, tools, and cases to facilitate, strengthen and guide hospital collaboration, co-operation and co-design efforts with communities to improve the health of its citizens. The group stated hospitals could and should work together with communities and evolve to improve the health and well-being of all citizens by addressing social determinants. While doing so, hospitals should continue delivering on their core mission, which is providing high-value care to its patients and families with “healthy staff.” Resources which could be made available in a global toolkit include partnership agreements, education and training materials, communication strategies, and co-design methodologies. Members of the sixth working group began their talk by describing the existing system as unsustainable. The speaker said the system “doesn’t know what it doesn’t know.” The group proposed co-producing a learning front end to enable a health-creating system that is accountable to the community. Members of this group suggested describing a theory of change based on people’s preferences and an understanding of needs and wants. The next steps would be to present a way to invite co-producers and then form or find communities of interest to refine and spread. One participant said what they were talking about was “transformational change” – starting with an individual and then extending to the system. Taking the work forward A seventh working group worked on an outline proposal for six peer-reviewed articles to be published by the British Medical Journal (BMJ), based on the themes that emerged during the session. The initial plan is to release these articles in 2018. The articles would be presented on a BMJ Collection page alongside any BMJ Opinion pieces written by Salzburg Global Fellows. Participants heard a working group would meet regularly to ensure the project moves forward. Suggested article themes already include the role of hospitals, lowering the walls and breaking down barriers, and how data can act as a bridge. Salzburg Global Program Director John Lotherington said Salzburg Global would do everything it can to support Fellows’ ideas, but he encouraged prime movers in each group to keep the conversation moving forward. Several participants said they would support the idea of producing a Salzburg Statement. Lotherington indicated this was something which could be pursued but would have to stem from a smaller working group first before it could branch out to all participants. Anne Weiss, managing director at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said the program had provided her the opportunity to discuss a challenge experienced in more than one country and that the conversation had moved from hospitals to health eco-systems. Susan Mende, a senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said participants had disproved the notion that something that happens in one part of the world can’t be applied to another. To conclude, Mende said participants had seen the "winds of change” at Salzburg Global, and a gale was beginning to build. The session, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals is part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
READ MORE...
Building Healthy Communities – Prioritizing Health Creation
Building Healthy Communities – Prioritizing Health Creation
Tomás De La Rosa 
The question of how health creation can remain a priority when institutions are geared to other primary goals is one that’s difficult to find just one answer for. Participants of the Salzburg Global session, Building Healthy Communities: The Roles of Hospital, considered the best strategies on Sunday morning as part of the session’s final plenary discussion. In addition, participants also explored how to creatively manage the trade-offs for everyone, not just health care institutions. To help them, Gary Cohen, Gale Surgenor, Eddie Bartnik, and Paul Burstow spoke from their experience and provided case studies to reflect on. Cohen discussed the broader mission hospitals have in supporting people in equitable and healthy societies through environmental sustainability. Calling hospitals “the cathedrals of our time,” he argued they need to reduce waste, use more sustainable energy sources, and eliminate toxic chemicals such as mercury. He also explained how hospitals contribute to the health of individuals, communities, and the planet, finishing with the open-ended question, “Who else is to defend the human right to health than ourselves who are responsible for healing?” Sharing the example of communities in South Auckland, New Zealand, where "only the hood can change the hood" is the rule, Surgenor explained how it’s essential to collaborate with communities to educate them about their own health. This type of co-design helps communities by having them teach institutions about human design. Bartnik, a strategic advisor to the National Disability Insurance Agency, highlighted the importance of connecting with local communities through positive assumptions and asking the right questions to help communities find local solutions. He also explained how strategic conversations are necessary for a fair and connected support system saying, “We must ensure it doesn’t take over and families or communities always have a say.” Paul Burstow, former Minister of State for the UK Department of Health, used the example of elderly people in health care losing value and agency due to their status, as a reminder of how services must be humble as they only represent 10 percent of the concept of health. “What people fundamentally want is to live a good life, and not be surrounded by systems,” he said. He then urged participants not to use co-production to perpetuate business arguing, “Products must enhance life, not burden people. Institutions should be fundamentally bottom-up; communities should instruct people at the top on what their needs are.” Reflecting on the discussion, a participant talked about how each individual’s story is different, saying, “With decision-makers, it's about considering how to budget effectively to provide appropriate care, but with patients, it needs to be how to improve their lives and create a better experience.” The session, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals is part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
READ MORE...
Sowing the Seeds of a Global Conversation - The Salzburg Questions Series
Sowing the Seeds of a Global Conversation - The Salzburg Questions Series
Katie Witcombe 
This article first appeared on the EAPC Blog on Monday, December 11. In response to Human Rights Day yesterday, 10th December, Katie Witcombe, Outreach Administrator for the Cicely Saunders Institute and one of the facilitators of the Salzburg Questions series, explains the importance of using digital campaigns to shine a spotlight on neglected issues and open up discussions to people all over the world.When the seed of an idea for a multidimensional series of questions was planted at the Salzburg Global Seminar in 2016, its capacity for growth was unknown. At a meeting to consider global opportunities and challenges in palliative care, which was attended by international experts in the field and facilitated by Professor Irene Higginson of the Cicely Saunders Institute, it was decided that an interactive, digital debate would be the most inclusive way to initiate conversations about the major issues currently facing palliative care provision and how best these can be tackled. A global conversation, including monthly Twitter ‘launches’ to coincide with international awareness days, corresponding blog posts, podcasts, videos and reports, was planned for the following 12 months with academic and clinical leads spearheading the campaign from around the world. Since its conception, the Salzburg Questions series has achieved a reach which has surpassed expectations; there has been an average of nearly 500 views for each blog post, the #allmylifeQs hashtag has received more than 10.4 million impressions on Twitter and been used in more than 3,500 tweets, and the online reach has extended to 182 countries. Monthly topics have included the inequality of palliative care provision in low- and middle-income countries, the emotional and financial impact of caring for a loved one at the end of life and the future research needed to improve care for vulnerable groups such as refugees, people with complex physical symptoms, and those living in poverty. The series has given project teams and researchers from world-leading institutions the opportunity to showcase their most recent research into global healthcare trends, place of death, how to support an ageing population and treatment for non-cancer conditions. These issues affect millions of people worldwide, and the application of this work into actual clinical practice has the potential to markedly improve the quality of life for patients and families approaching the end of life. Ultimately, the Salzburg Questions series has highlighted the appetite that exists for discussions about the issues affecting palliative care, and the role that online platforms such as Twitter have to play in these global conversations. In this digital age, closed-room discussions are becoming a thing of the past and impact can be measured in re-tweets and shares. Twitter discourse is a democratisation of the decision-making processes which have governed research for so long; people from all demographics and backgrounds can now help to shape the direction of future work by signposting the areas which they feel need the most investment. In the aftermath of Human Rights Day this weekend, an increased awareness of vulnerable or neglected groups should be celebrated, as should the involvement of patients, carers and families in these discussions. The blog posts published monthly by the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) may have been produced by experts in fields as diverse as global health inequity, patient and carer psycho-social needs, advance care planning and epidemiology, but it is the responses from researchers, clinicians and members of the public which have enabled this series to gain momentum and relevance over time. From tiny seeds, tall oaks can grow, and we hope that the roots that were laid over the course of the campaign will continue to flourish. The enthusiasm and engagement with which this series of questions has been met is a clear signifier of the conversations which people from all over the world are ready to have about the lasting need for high quality, effective and accessible palliative care. Links and Resources •    Catch up on the global Twitter discussions using the hashtag #allmylifeQs. The nine Salzburg Questions have been debated throughout 2017.•    Read all nine posts published on the EAPC Blog in the Salzburg Questions series.•    Find out more about the ongoing work of the Cicely Saunders Institute.•    Find out more about the programmes and strategic aims of the Salzburg Global Seminar.•    Follow Prof Irene Higginson @ij_higginson•    Follow Cicely Saunders Institute @CSI_KCL
READ MORE...
Displaying results 1 to 7 out of 206
<< First < Previous 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28 29-35 36-42 43-49 Next > Last >>

REPORTS